Diamond, Moissanite and CZ Different

Diamonds are eternal, and a diamond lasts forever. Its market and collector’s value has been favoured by people and it has become the gem of choice for engagements and weddings, but its high price still puts it off for most people. Today, however, there are several diamond-like substitutes on the market and we can have products that look like diamonds without spending a lot of money.

Diamond substitutes look very similar to diamonds, but in other ways they are different and even inferior. The most popular diamond substitutes today are man-made cubic zirconia (often marketed as sulphurite, high carbon diamond, cubic diamond, zirconia, CZ, etc.) and moissanite. Below we will discuss the origin, rarity and characteristics of Moissanite.

Comparison of diamond moissanite cz origins

Diamonds: Tens of millions of years ago, heated magma bubbled up from deep within the earth. As volcanic craters were often blocked, the rising magma cooled under extremely high pressure.

A small amount of pure carbon crystallised under this high temperature and pressure to form diamond, which is the raw diamond, the hardest substance known in nature.

Moissanite: Natural moissanite (silicon carbide), a meteorite from outer space.
Discovered by French Nobel Prize winner Henri Moissan in 1893 in Arizona, USA, from a fallen meteorite, it is a carbon-silicon bonded particle that does not exist on Earth. Scientists began to develop it because of its extraordinary brightness.

Cubic Zirconia (Soviet Diamond/High Carbon Diamond): Cubic Zirconia (Soviet Diamond/High Carbon Diamond) is a mass-produced imitation diamond introduced by the Soviet Union. It is a man-made compound that originated as a diamond imitation.

Gemstone rarity comparison

Diamonds are very rare. Mining natural diamonds is expensive, with several tonnes of earth being excavated for each carat of diamond, and very few diamonds reach gem quality. Only about 1 in 1 million diamonds mined is of gem quality.

Natural moissanite comes from outer space and is rarer on earth than diamonds. Moissanite on the market is hand-crafted, which has greatly increased its production.

Cubic zirconia (Soviet diamonds/high carbon diamonds) are not uncommon.

High-tech treated diamonds, based on the innovation of coated diamonds to highly imitate the color of natural real diamonds, have changed their formula from the original synthetic raw materials used to produce high imitation diamonds.

Comparing scintillation

Clarity and colour are important criteria in determining the value of a diamond. A lower clarity grade means that there are internal flaws which directly affect the beauty of the gemstone; the diamond laboratory classifies the colour of diamonds as D, E, F to W, from colourless to yellow.

A popular alternative to diamonds, high quality moissanite and high carbon diamonds have a clarity of VVS or higher, meaning they have very few flaws and are almost flawless. In terms of color, moissanite and high-carbon diamonds are also available in colorless grades D, E and F.

Diamond is a representative of nature and has the highest refractive index of any gemstone on earth.

Refractive index: 2.42

Dispersion: 0.044

Moissanite is a representative of space. It has a higher and brighter scintillation than most gemstones.

Refractive index: 2.64

Dispersion: 0.104

Cubic Zirconia is a representative of artificiality and its scintillation is comparable to that of diamonds.

Refractive index: 2.15–2.18

Dispersion: 0.060

Hardness comparison

Diamonds are the hardest gemstones, and on the Mohs scale of hardness, diamonds are undoubtedly the highest at 10.

They are closely followed by moissanite at 9.25, a difference that is not too great. Cubic zirconia (Siouxland diamonds/high carbon diamonds) has a lower hardness, but is still considered a hard stone with a Mohs hardness of about 8. Common metals are stainless steel with a hardness of 5.5, iron with a hardness of 4 to 5, and gold and silver with a hardness of 2.5 to 3.

Diamond: Mohs hardness: 10

Moissanite: 9.25 on the Mohs scale.

Cubic Zirconia: Mohs hardness: ~8.

Comparing Clarity and Color

Clarity and colour are important criteria in determining the value of a diamond. A lower clarity grade means that there are internal flaws which directly affect the beauty of the gemstone; the diamond laboratory classifies the colour of diamonds as D, E, F to W, from colourless to yellow.

A popular alternative to diamonds, high quality moissanite and high carbon diamonds have a clarity of VVS or higher, meaning they have very few flaws and are almost flawless. In terms of color, moissanite and high-carbon diamonds are also available in colorless grades D, E and F.

Price affordability comparison

Diamonds are very rare and expensive to mine, so the difference in price is obvious. Moissanite and high carbon diamonds are both much cheaper than diamonds.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Shopping Cart
Scroll to Top